pronombres español

Here’s a list of the English subject pronouns and their Spanish equivalents:

yo
                                       I
tú / usted 
                                       you
él
                                       he
ella
                                       she
ello                               it
nosotros /nosotras
                                       we
vosotros / vosotras 
ustedes
                                                    you
ellos / ellas
                                      they

Spanish subject pronouns are both similar to and different from their English counterparts. Let’s examine some of the differences. Look more closely at the English word “you.”

You have just seen that this can be translated into Spanish as “usted.” But there is also a second way it can be translated. There are two ways the English word “you” can be expressed in Spanish:

usted
you
you

Spanish has a formal and an informal form of the word “you.” “Usted” is more formal and is generally used to express respect. “Tú” is more familiar and is used among friends, coworkers, relatives, or when addressing a child.

Speaking to your boss: usted
Speaking to your daughter: 
Speaking to your teacher: usted
Speaking to your friend: 

usted = you formal

 = you informal (familiar)

This same distinction with regard to degree of formality occurs in the plural form as well. When referring to “you-all,” there are two choices in Spanish:

ustedes
you-all formal

vosotros
you-all familiar

Once again, the difference lies in the degree of formality conveyed by the speaker. However, the vosotros form is used primarily in Spain. Throughout Latin America, “ustedes” is generally used in both formal and informal situations to refer to “you-all.”

Speaking to a group of children
(in Spain): vosotros

Speaking to a group of children
(in Latin America): ustedes

Speaking to a group of strangers
(in Spain): ustedes

Speaking to a group of strangers
(in Latin America): ustedes

Note: usted can be abbreviated Ud. or Vd. ; ustedes can be abbreviated Uds. or Vds.

In many ways, Spanish is more gender-specific than English. We find evidence of this in the subject pronouns. First, look at the word “nosotros.” This means “we” in the sense of a group containing at least one male. If the group contains only females, the word “nosotras” is used. So, in Spanish, there are two ways to say “we”:

nosotros
we (masculine or mixed group)

nosotras
we (feminine)

This same idea applies to the English word “they”:

ellos
they (masculine or mixed group)

ellas
they (feminine)

This same idea also applies to the “vosotros” form:

vosotros
you-all familiar (masculine or mixed group)

vosotras
you-all familiar (feminine)

Note: These forms are used primarily in Spain, not Latin America.

Finally, don’t get confused over the difference between talking to a group or talking about a group. Consider the following statement, which could have been made by your Spanish teacher, while standing before the class:

“You-all need to study your Spanish. Those students in the other class don’t need to study Spanish. They are studying French. You-all can practice Spanish in Spain. They can practice French in France.”

The teacher is talking to the Spanish students and about the French students.

Talking to a group, use “you-all”:

ustedes
vosotros
vosotras

Talking about a group, use “they”:

ellos
ellas

Here’s the complete list of Spanish subject pronouns:

Singular

yo – I

 – you (familiar)

él – he
ella – she

ello – it

usted – you (formal)

         

         Plural

            nosotros
                    we (masculine or mixed gender)
            nosotras
                    we (feminine)
            vosotros
                    you-all (familiar, Spain, masculine or mixed gender)
            vosotras
                    you-all (familiar, Spain, feminine)
            ellos
                   they (masculine or mixed gender)
            ellas
                   they (feminine)
            ustedes
                    you-all (formal in Spain, formal and familiar in Latin                
                    America)

PRONOMBRES PERSONALES

Fuente:

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/subpro.htm

 

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